HealthIn The NewsMANHUNT Cares
December 1, 2011

Don’t Forget: Today Is World AIDS Day!

What does World AIDS Day mean to you? Each year on December 1, people worldwide unite in the fight against HIV, showing support for people living with HIV and remembering those we’ve lost along the way. This year’s theme is “Getting To Zero” – zero new HIV infections, zero discrimination and zero AIDS related deaths.

Although this may seem like a very ambitious goal, recent reports have shown that we’re on the right track. Due to a significant expansion in access to treatment, we’ve increased the number of people living with HIV to a record-breaking 34 Million. Please join the Manhunt family in celebrating this small victory with the American Foundation for AIDS Research’s (amfAR) Making AIDS History campaign.

In order to increase global awareness, it’s important that we all listen to and understand the stories of people living with HIV, as well as share our own experiences in the fight against HIV. Click through to hear a few of those stories, or head over to Manhunt Cares for additional information on advances in HIV treatment.

Should the spirit move you, feel free to chime in with your own stories!

– Dewitt

ORIOL:

Oriol, 41, has been living with HIV since 1992 and has covered HIV/AIDS and LGBT issues as a reporter and editor since 1996.

DAVID:

David, 27, has been living with HIV since 2007. He now works to educate other gay men and young people about HIV and STDs, stressing prevention, awareness, and testing.

LONNY:

Lonny, 59, has been living with HIV since at least 1983, when he was diagnosed with Kaposi’s Sarcoma. He started powerful anti-HIV treatment in 1996 and is now living a healthy life.

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356 Comments - View all

buy term paper 2:48pm on May 25, 2012

I am very satisfied i visited this site.

  • GISHEC

    Considering the world population is reaching 7 billion – that is 1 in 200 (0.5%) has HIV/AIDS. Great strides.

  • Cortez

    Still people are reckless with their health and sadly it”s still regarded as a gay disease by many or something Africa has a problem with. 

  • Much higher

    Not counting, of course, countries where medical testing is nonexistent or countries who under report, such as China, North Korea, etc.

  • I am very satisfied i visited this site.